Experience Culture Night and Halloween



Moving anywhere new is difficult at first - writer Shani Bishop offers the best advice on how to join in.


Photographs: Kulturnatten FB Page / Tivoli FB Page

Text: Shani Bishop


When you have lived somewhere for a few years, you get to know the rhythm of the country and learn when the festivals and good events are. A few are coming up before Christmas, which are worth noting in your diary.


Holiday programmes

The municipalities always run courses for kids during the autumn and winter breaks and usually for the first two weeks of summer. The programme varies from town to town but booking ahead is essential. In Gentofte, the list was extensive and varied from canoeing to karate and diving. Usually, when the programme appeared, there was an online booking system. You sit in an online queue on the day it starts and then book when it’s your turn, usually 17:00. Most good courses go on the first day. The best thing about these courses is how cheap they are. I used to pay 100 DKK for a two-day course. Lots of internationals book these courses, so there are usually English-speaking kids on these courses.

Have a look at the programme run by Gentofte municipality: https://gentofte.dk/fritid/idraet-og-bevaegelse/aktiv-ferie-for-boern-og-unge/



"Culture night happens on the first Friday night of the autumn break. You buy a programme and badge for each person and then turn up or book some events. Again, book early as the best ones disappear quickly."

Culture night

This night happens on the first Friday night of the autumn break. The programme changes every year. You buy a programme and badge for each person and then turn up or book some events. Again, book early as the best ones disappear quickly. One year I got lucky and booked the candlelight tour of Rosenborg Castle. Everyone said how great it was, but my kids didn’t like it at all, and I loved it. That’s kids for you! When the new extended Metro first opened, we travelled all the way round on the circle line, enjoying the newness of it. I think a lot of people did. Many popular places are hectic during these holidays, so there’s a lot of queuing. But it is fun for the kids to stay out late and try new things.

Find out more here: www.kulturnatten.dk/en/Culture-night


Museums

Many of the museums run entertaining events during the autumn break too. For example, I like the re-enactments they do at the Danish War Museum and Kronborg Slot. One year we saw two galleons slug it out, firing cannons at each other in the Øresund. Another time the Swedes and Danes fought on boats in the moat at Kronborg.


Halloween

Halloween is a big thing in Denmark. Tivoli looks fantastic, and I loved the goriness of it. It’s much gorier than the UK. My boys loved buying bloodied limbs to leave on seats for their grandparents to find. My favourite part is the alleyway that looks a bit like Harry Potter near the station entrance.


We always went trick-or-treating around the station at Hellerup - this is an excellent area for it. The local residents go to enormous efforts with tombstones in front gardens, dummies dressed up as zombies, smoke, music and people jumping out at passers-by. We always returned with too much candy. However, be aware of unwrapped candy.

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