Relocation ready



Our resident ‘settling-in’ expert, Laura Wintemute from Homestead Denmark, has drawn up a list of the most important things you will need to sort out before and immediately after your arrival in Denmark.


Photograph: iStock

Text: Laura Wintemute


Whether you’re contemplating a move to Denmark and on your way here, or if you’re a newly arrived international, our guide to setting up in this Nordic heaven will no doubt become your Bible over the next few issues. Depending on where you’re from, why you’ve come to Denmark or how long you plan to stay, there are several things you will need to do to smoothly transition from your old life into this new and fine Danish one.


Before you arrive

The registration procedure depends on your nationality, the duration of how long you expect to stay in Denmark and your place of residence. Several different residence permits will apply to your particular case so in order to ensure you follow the correct procedure, take a look at www.newindenmark.dk


Eu/EEA/Swiss citizens

Step 1: Apply for an EU Residence Certificate at the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) or at the International Citizen Service.

Step 2: Register for your Danish personal registration number – commonly known as CPR – at International Citizen Service or municipal Citizen Service Center (Borgerservice). This will be issued along with your yellow ‘health card’ that you will need going forward, for all administrative and medical purposes.

Step 3: Create a tax card online www.skat.dk or at International Citizen Service.

Step 4: Apply for the blue European health card online www.lifeindenmark.dk

Apply for a Residence Certificate at International Citizen Service in Aalborg, Aarhus, Odense or Copenhagen or SIRI.

"Eu/EEA citizens can stay in Denmark for up to 180 days without a residence permit. Non-Eu citizens can stay up to 90 days."

Non-Eu Citizens

Step 1: Apply for a Residence and Work Permit at the Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI) www.newtodenmark.dk

Step 2: Register for a Danish CPR number and the yellow health card at International Citizen Service or municipal Citizen Service Center (Borgerservice)

Step 3: Create a tax card online www.skat.dk or at International Citizen Service


It’s important to note that the property you choose to rent must meet the ‘residence requirement’ in order for your CPR to be approved. Properties with the certification of “Bopælspligt” is what you need to look out for.

Finding a home before you arrive in Denmark

To complete your CPR registration (Step 2 above), you will need to have a leasing contract in your name for a valid rental property for at least 30 days.


The Danish Rental Market is a challenge, to say the least. Limited property options, high monthly rents, property size differences and a fast-moving market all make this experience quite possibly the most challenging one. Therefore, it’s best if you start looking for a rental at least three months before you arrive in Denmark. This way, you will already have an address that will allow you to get your CPR, not to mention saving you costly hotel fees while searching for accommodation.


There are many paid online sites, including Boligportal or Lejebolig, but using Certified Rental agencies are at zero cost to you, and they are reputable. They screen the Landlords, take care of the leasing contract (Danish versions) and sometimes conduct the move-in inspections - all at the cost of the landlord.

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